Books, papers, essays, and other scholarly and/or published works
that mention or discuss TORn or some TORn personage


Alphabetical by title

The Frodo Franchise: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood (Kristin Thompson)

Thompson, K. (2007). The Frodo Franchise: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood. (pp. 88-89, 107, 116, 134, 136, 137fig, 143, 155-160, 156fig, 159-160, 162-163, 170, 174, 180-181, 183-187, 188-190, 199, 201, 218, 223, 288, 348-149n54, 350n13). Berkeley and Los Angeles, California: University of California Press. Thompson's blog: The Frodo Franchise / University of California Press / UCPress: sample pages
ISBN 978 05202 4774 1
Kristin Thompson interviewed seventy-six people to examine the movies' scripting and design and the new technologies deployed to produce the films, video games, and DVDs. She demonstrates the impact the Lord of the Rings films had on the companies that made them, on the fantasy genre, on New Zealand, and on independent cinema.
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pg 43 - Calisuri - Cannes 2001 - FOTR preview - importance of internet sites to film publicity
pg 48 - Quickbeam - invited to NewLine offices to see the FOTR preview - 2001

From Hobbits to Hollywood: Essays On Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings (Ernest Mathijs and Murray Pomerance, eds.)

Mathijs, E., & Pomerance, M. (2006). From Hobbits to Hollywood: Essays on Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings. (pp. 107, 109, 118, 125, 142-143, 170, 172, 200, 211, 312, 336, 360, 374-375, 381-384, 387-389, 393-400, 402-403). New York, NY: Rodopi.
ISBN-10: 9042020628
ISBN-13: 978-9042020627
These are essays written by leading scholars in the study of cinema and culture about the LOTR films. Ranging from interpretations of The Lord of the Rings’ ideological and philosophical implications, through discussions of its changing fandoms and its incorporation into the Hollywood industry of stars, technology, genre, and merchandising, to considerations of CGI effects, acting, architecture and style, the essays contained here open a new vista of criticism and light for ardent fans of J.R.R. Tolkien, followers of Jackson, and all those who yearn for a deeper appreciation of cinema and its relation to culture.

How We Became Middle-earth: A collection of Essays on The Lord of the Rings (Adam Lam and Nataliya Oryshchuk, eds.)

Lam, A., & Oryshchuk, N. (2007). In How We Became Middle-earth: A collection of Essays on The Lord of the Rings. (pp. 38 - 41). Zürich: Walking Tree Publishers.
ISBN-10: 3905703076
ISBN-13: 978-3905703078
Topics in these essays range from fan culture in an age of IT, globalization, transnational capitalism and consumerism, to the local socio-political implications of the Rings tale, and the formation of a Middle-earth in our real (or, as argued by the French philosopher Jean Beaudrillard, our no longer real but hyperreal) world.
Interview by Anne Buchmann with Erica Challis.

The Lord of the Rings: Popular Culture in Global Context (Ernest Mathijs, ed.)

Mathijs, E. (2006). The Lord of the Rings: Popular Culture in Global Context. (pp. 12, 14, 36, 41, 114, 146, 173, 176, 178-188, 182, 184-186, 292, 312, 317, 334-335, 338, 340). New York, NY: Columbia University Press. Google Book Sample
ISBN-10: 1904764827
ISBN-13: 978-1904764823
An anthology that takes the release of the LOTR film trilogy as a point of departure for an overview of the international impact of The Lord of the Rings in a range of cultural environments by analyzing the merchandising, box office figures, distribution, critical reception, fan following, and cult status of the films, and focuses on how the different faces of the phenomenon, like the trailers, DVD editions, websites, computer games, music, location tours, and even its unlikely erotic spin-offs, contributed to making The Lord of the Rings the most publicly recognised brand image of the 21st century so far.

Peter Jackson: From Prince of Splatter To Lord of the Rings (Ian Pryor)

Pryor, I. (2004). Peter Jackson: From Prince of Splatter to Lord of the Rings. (pp. 333, 368-370, 377-378). New York, NY: Thomas Dunne Books.
ISBN-10: 0312322941
ISBN-13: 978-0312322946
An unauthorized biography of Peter Jackson.

Reading The Lord of the Rings: New Writings On Tolkien's Classic (Robert Eaglestone, ed.)

Eaglestone, R. (2005). Reading The Lord of the Rings: New Writings on Tolkien's Classic. (p. 129). London and New York, UK and NY: Continuum.
ISBN-10: 0826484603
ISBN-13: 978-0826484604
This book provides a comprehensive critical and theoretical analysis of both the book and films. Beginning with an introduction to the critical history of Tolkien's work, the book offers different ways of reading the works through key critical approaches like philosophical, postcolonial, and gender criticism. Chapters focus on core topics and concepts such as time, home, the gothic, the concept of the ring, women, and homosexuality, and show how focusing on these questions can enable different readings of the novels and films. The final section looks at the continuing influence of Tolkien's work on fantasy fiction, and in contemporary game and electronic narratives.

Studying the Event Film: The Lord of the Rings (Harriet Margolis, Sean Cubitt, Barry King and Thierry Jutel, eds.)

Margolis, H., Cubitt, S., King, B., & Jutel, T. (2009). In Studying the Event Film: The Lord of the Rings. (pp. 39n.7,164, 196, 204n.1, 311, 313, 323. ) Manchester and New York, UK and US: Manchester University Press.
ISBN-10: 0719071984
ISBN-13: 978-0719071980
A collection of essays from 25 contributors that use The Lord of the Rings trilogy as an case study for event films (films integrated with internet, computer games and news media).
Includes reference to TORn's 2000 Q&A with Peter Jackson.

Two roads to Middle-earth converge: Observing text-based and film-based mental images from TheOneRing.net fan community. (Jennifer Grek Martin)

Grek Martin, J. M. (2011). Two roads to Middle-earth converge: Observing text-based and film-based mental images from TheOneRing.net fan community. (Master’s thesis). Dalhousie University. Dalspace Repository. Faculty of Graduate Studies Online Thesis. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14242
This research compares the creation of mental images arising from reading a story -- J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings -- to those inspired from watching a film adaptation -- Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings cinematic trilogy (2002-2004). Discussions from TheOneRing.net message boards were analyzed according to references to visualization and to geographic locations and cultures within the epic, resulting in a demonstrated ability for reader/spectators to expand and combine mental images from both media.

Watching the Lord of the Rings: Tolkien's World Audiences (Martin Barker and Ernest Mathijs, eds.)

Barker, M., & Mathijs, E. (2008). Watching the Lord of the Rings: Tolkien's World Audiences. (pp. 3, 35, 38-42, 44, 52). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.
ISBN-10: 0820463965
ISBN-13: 978-0820463964
How did audiences across the world respond to the Lord of the Rings films? This book presents findings from the largest film audience project ever undertaken, drawing from 25,000 questionnaire responses and a wide array of other materials. Contributors used these materials to explore a series of widely speculated questions: why is film fantasy important to different kinds of viewers? Through marketing, previews and reviews, debates and cultural chatter, how are audiences prepared for a film like this? How did fans of the book respond to its adaptation on screen? How do people choose their favorite characters? How was the films’ reception shaped by different national and cultural contexts?


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